The College of The Bahamas
                   
           School of English Studies
Courses

English Literature and Writing Courses

        200 Level : 300 Level : 400 Level : Linguistics                       
ENG 119 - College Eng Skills I
In this course students develop critical thinking, reading and expository writing skills. Students are introduced to text-based expository writing using the drafting process and to the principles of research and documentation. They examine Bahamian texts and cultural productions.
ENG 120 - College English Skills II
Eng 120 reinforces the critical reading, writing and analytical skills taught in Eng 119 with an added focus on argumentation. Students are encouraged, through exploration of complex issues and textual analysis, to become independent writers, readers, speakers and thinkers.
ENG 121 - Elementary English Structure
An elementary linguistics course which focuses on the similarities and differences of Standard English and Bahamian Dialect. It provides a theoretical background for language majors.
ENG 122 - Creative Writing I
A course designed to involve students in reading, discussion, appraisal, writing and rewriting of aspects of poetry, short story, the one act play in order to explore, define and activate their literary talents.
ENG 124 - Introduction to Criticism
In this course students are introduced to the analysis of three literary genres - fiction, poetry and drama - and are exposed to literary terms essential for the close reading of texts.
ENG 130 - Intro to Creative Writing: Poetry & Prose
In this course students analyze the elements, styles and techniques of poetry and creative prose by examining major works of prominent writers. They also develop their craft as writers of various forms of poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction through exercises and workshops, editing, re-writing and journaling.

200 Level Courses

ENG 201 - Introduction to Theatre
In this course students analyse drama as literature and as performed art. They study theatre history and the collaborative processes that take plays from page to stage. They critique plays and stage productions based on their artistic merit and examine the growth of Bahamian theatre.
ENG 208 - Bahamian Literature
In this course students are introduced to the written literature of The Bahamas post Majority Rule and are provided with a critical framework for the study of Bahamian literature that addresses social, cultural and political dynamics in the contemporary Bahamas.
ENG 209 - Popular Fiction
In this course students focus on short stories and novels by prominent authors from five genres of popular fiction - detective, science, fantasy, horror and romance. Emphasis is on themes, forms and the literary conventions of each genre; consideration is given to pertinent socio-cultural and aesthetic influences.
ENG 212 - Shakespeare: Desire, Deception, Death
In this course, students are introduced to the plays of Shakespeare and their historical and theatrical contexts. Students examine three representative plays.
ENG 213 - West Indian Literature: Decolon, Regen, Creols
This course introduces students to selected West Indian authors and their works. An overview of the major historical, social and cultural experiences that have shaped the region's literature grounds the examination of both thematic and stylistic elements in West Indian fiction, poetry and drama.
ENG 214 - Literature for Children
This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of some of the best literature for children, a brief history of the literature and the criteria for selecting quality books. Consideration is given to literature suitable for Bahamian primary schools and to criteria for its selection.
ENG 215 - Contemporary African Literature
In this course students are introduced to the field of contemporary African literature in English and in translation. Students examine the literary, cultural, political and sociolinguistic contexts of African literature through a reading of works by the continent's major writers.
ENG 216 - Introduction to Film Studies
This course introduces students to the study of film as text and as a form of dramatic expression. Students examine the history of film and the methods used to analyse film technique and interpret meaning.
ENG 217 - Introduction to Poetry
This course focuses on a critical and analytical approach to the appreciation of poetry, with particular reference to the nature and effectiveness of the style and intrinsic value of the content.
ENG 222 - Creative Writing II
An advanced course of writing in four genres: poetry, short fiction, prose and the one-act-play. Emphasis is on the continued development of techniques and styles through readings and students' own writing.
ENG 223 - Writing For Travel And Tourism
This course focuses on the teaching of a variety of writing formats applicable to the tourism industry including brochures, newspapers, and magazine articles. A general interest course, this elective is of particular interest to marketing, journalism, tourism, and business students.
ENG 229 - Survey of African American Literature
In this course students examine major African-American writers from the colonial period to the 1930s. They explore the historical, social and political contexts from which the African-American literary tradition emerged. Students examine the stylistic, ideological and thematic features of African-American literature across genres.

300 Level Courses

ENG 300 - Advanced Writing: Bahamian Culture and Society
In this advanced writing course students analyse and produce writing that addresses issues of national importance in The Bahamas. They conduct research into the cultural, political, social, economic and environmental factors that shape the Bahamian way of life.
ENG 301 - Advanced Writing Skills
This course teaches skills required for reading, writing and thinking critically at an advanced level. Special focus is given to writing effective arguments within and across the disciplines.
ENG 303 - American Literature I: 1620-1865
In this course students are introduced to American literature from its colonial beginnings to 1865. Students examine the origins and development of American literature focusing on its sociocultural, historical, political, religious, intellectual and aesthetic influences through representative readings from the Colonial through the Civil War periods.
ENG 304 - American Literature II: 1865 - Present
In this course students are introduced to the intellectual, historical and cultural currents in American literature from 1865 to the present. Students examine works and authors representative of important trends in American literary development.
ENG 305 - British Literature I: 450 -1785
In this course students examine the origins and developments of British literature focusing on its sociocultural, historical, political, religious, intellectual and aesthetic influences. They examine representative genres from the Middle Ages to the late eighteenth century for changes in form, theme and style.
ENG 306 - British Literature II: 1785-Present
In this course student examine developments in British literature focusing on various forms and genres of the Romantics, the Victorians and writers of the twentieth century. Students study representative texts from 1785 to the present for changes in form, theme and style.
ENG 309 - The Short Story
This course introduces students to the short story as a literary genre. Emphasis is on the development of analytical skills and critical idiom pertinent to an understanding of forms and techniques of the genre.
ENG 311 - Literary Theory
In this course students examine the major critical approaches to literature from those of the Greek philosophers to the major schools of contemporary literacy criticism. Students apply a range of approaches to representative texts to understand how literature produces meaning, affects readers, reflects and shapes society.
ENG 312 - Studies in Modern Drama
In this course students examine modern world theatre from the 1890s to the present. They become familiar with the philosophies, aesthetics and ideologies that have informed modern drama. Modern plays are critiqued on the basis of form and content.
ENG 313 - Issues in West Indian Discourse
In this course students examine issues in West Indian discourse through the analysis of poetry, short fiction, novels, plays and essays. Students use the perspectives of the region's major literary theorists and critics to inform their analyses.
ENG 314 - Historical Dev. of Children's Lit
In this course students examine themes, forms and techniques of children's literature from its folk origins to the present through a reading of representative works. They also examine the concomitant philosophical and social forces that influenced and continue to influence writers and young readers.
ENG 318 - Special Topics in Literature
This course offers a detailed examination of a special topic focusing on a theme, author, period or genre. Using close readings, it provides an in-depth analysis of the topic and an understanding of social and cultural factors that influence the creation of literature.
ENG 326 - Evolution of African American Novel
In this course students focus on major African-American novelists from slavery to the present. Students explore the historical, cultural, social and political contexts in which the African-American novel has evolved. They examine the stylistic, ideological and thematic features of the African-American novel.
ENG 330 - History of Film
In this course students explore the development of the cinematic arts. They examine the historical milestones in film technology, groundbreaking techniques of directors and cinematographers and analyze the relationship between film and their historical contexts. They also critique the thematic and stylistic aspects of cinema as art.
ENG 351 - Genre Studies: The Novel
In this course students examine various theories of the novel and their application to a practical criticism of specific novels. The emphasis is on a comprehensive view of the theory of the novel from the nineteenth century to the current post-colonial linguistic and feminist revisions of the received form of the genre.

400 Level Courses

ENG 400 - Studies in Bahamian Culture
This course takes a broad, multidisciplinary approach to the study of Bahamian cultural identity through the reading of various texts. Students examine the influence of region, politics, religion, race, ethnicity, gender and social class in the creation of Bahamian cultural identity.
ENG 405 - Studies in Bahamian English
In this course students consider the socio-historical and linguistics factors which contribute to the formation and establishment of language varieties, particularly Bahamian Creole (popularly known as Bahamian Dialect). Students examine the socio-linguistic implications for Creole-speaking countries with distinct national and official languages and receive training in linguistic field methods.
ENG 410 - Caribbean Women Writers
This course is an in-depth study of writing by and about Caribbean women. It highlights women's contributions to literature in the region in the context of the historical forces that shaped their social, political, ethnic and cultural experiences.
ENG 412 - Western Tradition Major Works in Translation
In this course students examine a range of major works from non-English classical and contemporary writers. Emphasis is on works and writers who have had the most influence on Western philosophies of literature and on the writers' place in the social historical milieu.
ENG 413 - Contemporary World Lit (Non-Western)
This course focuses on non-Western literatures post 1945. It surveys poetry, drama and prose by critically acclaimed authors from Latin America, the non-Anglophone Caribbean, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. These literatures are analysed according to form and content and are placed in their socio-historical and cultural contexts.
ENG 415 - Postcolonial Literature
In this course students examine various responses to colonialism and post-colonialism through analysis of representative literary works from former British colonial territories: the Indian subcontinent, Africa, Australia and the Caribbean. Students apply a range of post-colonial theories to the analysis of literary texts within historical, cultural and political contexts.
ENG 416 - Shakespeare: Tragedies & Histories
In this course students examine a selection of Shakespeare's tragedies and history plays within the context of their production and reception. They examine literary and dramatic elements common to both genres and apply critical approaches to the reading of the plays to arrive at a variety of interpretations.
ENG 417 - Shakespearean Comedy
This course focuses on Shakespeare's comedic art as entertainment and social criticism. Students examine this art within the historical, social and cultural context of the period.
ENG 418 - Gender and Literature
In this course students focus on the relationship between gender and literature. They analyse the influence of gender on literary texts and examine the ways literature reflects, creates and challenges gender transhistorically and cross-culturally.
ENG 419 - Race & Film: The African American Image
In this course students examine the socio-cultural, political and economic factors influencing black representation in 20th century American films. They analyse films that represent African Americans both stereotypically and atypically and consider ideologies that inform the style and content of each film.
ENG 420 - Senior Thesis I
In this course students focus on research and analytic skills essential for undertaking a substantial piece of independent work in a specific area of literary studies. Students acquire skills necessary for writing a thesis proposal by emphasizing research methods, critical approaches and analytic techniques.
ENG 421 - Senior Thesis II
In this course students build on research and analytic skills emphasised in ENG 420 (Senior Thesis I). Students deepen their understanding of literature and critical theory by producing a substantial piece of independent research. Under the guidance of a faculty advisor, students complete a thesis that demonstrates original critical thought.
ENG 498 - Senior Thesis I
In this course students focus on research and analytic skills essential for undertaking a substantial piece of independent work in a specific area of literary studies. Students acquire skills necessary for writing a thesis proposal by emphasizing research methods, critical approaches and analytic techniques.
ENG 499 - Senior Thesis II
In this course students build on research and analytic skills emphasised in ENG 498 (Senior Thesis I). Students deepen their understanding of literature and critical theory by producing a substantial piece of independent research. Under the guidance of a faculty advisor, students complete a thesis that demonstrates original critical thought.

Linguistics Courses

LIN 200 - Language In Society
An examination of the structure of language and its function in society. Various areas within the field of linguistics are explored, including the origin, acquisition and neurological foundations of language.
LIN 205 - Seminar In Bahamian Dialect
A survey of the historical, social and linguistic factors which contribute to the formation and establishment of a language or a dialect, particularly Bahamian Dialect. This course includes training in field methods with emphasis on the collection and analysis of linguistic data.
LIN 210 - Language Development
This course focuses on the major factors that determine and influence child language development. It examines the predictable stages of language acquisition with some attention to a typical language development.
LIN 220 - Introduction To Sociolinguistics
This course examines the relationship between language and society, and explores language diversity within and across speech communities. It focuses on differences in speech and various social contexts, the social functions of language, and how language conveys social meaning.